Tag Archives: Mar roxas

Truth About Noynoy’s Psychological Problem: Carmen Pedrosa


May 8, 2010 (Saturday) Carmen N. Pedrosa

The machines that will fail; letters from Boston

It is not as if it is being said for the first time. I repeat what others have said that failure of election will not come from the PCOS but from two other machines –  FV (Filipino voter) and FC (Filipino candidates).

The machines are so out of date, they cannot function properly for the selection of leaders for our country. The FV is out of sync and performs as if it has nothing to do with why he is voting a particular FC. The FC operates within this flaw and produces results with nothing to do with FV.

That in brief is the problem we face when the results are known after May 10. When disaster strikes and the country malfunctions (with candidates declaring beforehand that they will not accept defeat) let us put the blame on those who refused to accept that the machines are not and cannot work unless these are fixed.

*       *       *

Among those I turned to in my quest for information that would help voters choose a qualified candidate to be our president is another family friend of both the Aquinos and the Agulars. They formed a tightly knit Filipino community in Boston. Let us just call him Jim because, he, too like so many others who have something to say about Noynoy as unfit to be president of the Philippines does not want to expose himself.

*       *       *

Dear Ms. Pedrosa

Just when I think of giving up on RP…because it doesn’t want to be helped…I meet someone

of your high stature—who is into saving RP (from dud leaders?). I am naturally encouraged again.

To go into your inquiry, I am sorry to tell you that I do not have any medical information about Noynoy.

Seriously, I don’t hope to go into that route. I have always relied on my own personal observation and inference in evaluating

a person, and that is how I form my idea of someone who should not even think of being president.

I’m sorry to sound preachy, but I think it is time for us Filipinos to discern that way about candidates who simply “like” public positions, but which are out of their aptitude.

The Agulars and I stayed together everyday of my trip there leading to the Upsilon reunion at the Manila Polo Club. Steve and I belong to that Batch. And to his widow and son’s family, it was a sentimental reunion with “Steve’s brods.”

To this day, we are each other’s extended families, as when we both lived in Massachusetts.

Personally, I think the Agulars, (especially the late Dr. S. Agular), are apolitical. But they are very loyal to family friends. The Aquinos are one.

In politics, I am more loyal to RP ( the Republic of the Philippines. That’s why Gordon is my candidate. I wish to read more of your regular columns. I think we have many sensible things in common about what is good for RP.

This letter was followed by another.

Thank you for this attention…tho’ undeserved… but I would rather not be another ‘witness to corroborate’ the imperfections of Noynoy. I believe we have enough evidence in the open to convince a nation that Noynoy should best be left to himself…not running for president…and certainly not be used—not by his sisters, not by

his relatives, and not fussed about by the media.

Unfortunately, the RP media abetted this yet another political aberration. It’s our culture

and our habit to promote the bizarre and the incompetent, e.g. Erap, Lapid, Revilla, etc.

We prefer to be entertained, it seems that way. And this might sell newspapers,

but it carries no responsibility.

I could not believe, for instance, the headlines that came out from both The Philippine Inquirer and the Philippine Star newspapers. They actually hailed the dramatic internal struggle of Noynoy to make a decision for the ‘big plum.’ Is there a movie about this heir cashing in on a huge political inheritance?

That’s right…the media played a big part in making a Noynoy attractive to the millions

of impressionable voters.  Of course, it’s not lost in me that we (you & I?) might be that child yelling to the crowd that the king is shriveled in the head, and has no clothes.

But we have to look back some 30 years ago. How much can we rely on Pinoy “kantiyaw” humor…things said in anecdotal bantering of a small party of friends?

In MA then, I remember asking why…”itong anak ni Ninoy ang layo kung sumagot.” (not

in the presence of Ninoy, of course.)

And the answer I got was: …”kasi may kulang.” …which was consistent with what

I thought was a missing bolt in his head. (never occurred to me that he would run for

president, let alone his mother, Cory!…years after. Cory, I think, was a disaster for RP.)

Thirty years since…I repeated the incident, and the answer I got was: “ikaw naman…! ‘di naman gano’n ang ibig sabihin ng “kulang”.

And what did it mean? The explanation was that…he was “kulang sa pansin

ng tatay”….because all the attention was given to the (spoiled) youngest, Kris. And this, supposedly,

had a big impact on the “kid.”

I see…but not quite. I may get into EXPLANATIONS, but still this is not the DISCUSSION I want to get into

with my friends. So I left this matter to rest. Besides, it is a 30 year-old personal observation of a “kid”. Times have changed. I’m often chided. Even some people are able to get out of cancer, so I’m reminded.

Today, I am further reassured, “Have you heard Noynoy speak lately? He KNOWS how to speak in public now.”

And is this why ‘that kid’ is urged to run for president?!?

*       *       *

These letters reinforce the opinion that the validity of a psychiatric report on a person’s ability to lead does not rest on whether the report was signed. Indeed the report can be true even without a signature.

What is necessary is that what it reports can be verified through other means. It is not the signature that makes the report. Experts arrive at their conclusions by observation, asking questions and then evaluating their observations through the prism of knowledge through textbooks and experience. Ordinary people can do the same without having formal expertise.

Reports do not become bogus for a lack of signature. The details of the report have been reported widely and interpreted by its readers according to what they hear, what they see, and make their own profile of the person concerned.

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Sen. Noynoy Aquino: MAY SAKIT NGA BA SA UTAK?


Circulating around the net…

 

 

 

 

 

Why not Sen.Noynoy take the challenge of having A Psych Test?

Karapatan naman natin malaman at suriin mabuti ang mga kandidato natin lalo na sa personal side. Kung yung health concern nga at drug testing ginagawa why not mental capacity?

 

 

Baby James supports Villar!


Mommy kris, please let me go I am an Avid fan of President Villar, not ngoyngoy!

A repairman came to my brother’s place yesterday and told us this story about Kris Aquino’s sortie in Bacolod on Monday evening, March 29, 2010.

Kris: Baby James, sino yung iboboto natin sa pagka presidente?

Baby James shouted: Si Villar!

Kris moved away quickly and started on an impromptu number hoping that the people did not catch what Baby James said. ABS CBN did not broadcast this incident.

Well … as they say, babies do not lie, do they?

Baby James really like the color Orange as in!

Papa James and Baby James for Villar!


Senator Noynoy Aquino certified Chain Smoker of the Philippines


Need proof?

Senator Noynoy is my Buddy, we are inseparable!

Senator Noynoy Aquino on Site Hacking Plan!


Beware of DIRTY TACTICS! the new media team of Noynoy Aquino, headed by ENTENG ROMANO, employed JASON BRADLEY, British IT Expert/Hacker in leading email & text blasts of LIES for smear campaign as well as site hacking. Bradley hacked websites of Noy’s rivals to prove his capability.

Noynoy Aquino: Buti na lang para sa akin ang GLOBE, ABS-CBN at DAILY INQUIRER... flawless ang magiging pagtira ko sa mga kalaban ko! Amazing.

Remember the Story about Mikee Cojuanco Destroying Senator Manny Villar’ s  Website?

Check it out: https://goodmorningclass.wordpress.com/2010/02/12/noynoy-aquino-to-sabotage-manny-villars-website/

Note:

Mukhang desperado na ang Noynoy Camp….lahat gagawin manalo lang pati EDSA Revolution inangkin na, kulang na lang gawing santong kabayo si Noynoy Aquino!

Bad mouth talaga si Mar Roxas!!!


http://www.philstar.com/ArticlePrint…ticleId=554264

NP ‘shocked’ at Roxas’ attack on orange-clad Cebu inmates
(The Freeman) Updated March 02, 2010 12:00 AM

CEBU, Philippines – Nacionalista Party (NP) spokesman and senatorial bet Adel Tamano yesterday hit back at Liberal Party (LP) vice-presidential bet Manuel “Mar” Roxas II for mocking NP standard-bearer Manuel “Manny” Villar’s orange campaign color by maliciously associating it with the Cebu dancing inmates.

While Tamano was not dismayed by Roxas’ swipe, he was nonetheless “shocked at how someone like [Roxas], educated at that, can carelessly pass judgment on people.”

During LP’s political rally in Cebu, Roxas was quoted as saying: “Yung mga dancing inmates na nasa loob ng presohan ay madadagdagan na. Tutal, kapareho ng kulay naka-orange, kaya lahat ng mga tiwali ay magsama-sama na. Lahat ng mga tiwali at lahat ng mga baluktot ay isasama na natin sa loob ng preso.” (The number of dancing inmates will rise. Anyway, they are like the guy in orange, and so all the wrongdoers should stay together. All the wrongdoers and the crooked, we will put inside the provincial jail.)

In reaction, Tamano said inmates are still Filipinos and have rights that must be respected and protected.

“The law cites that people are innocent until proven guilty. Most inmates are still awaiting trial and as such cannot be loosely called criminals, wrongdoers or crooked,” he said.

“Even convicted criminals do not deserve to be dragged into this political mudslinging that our rivals seem to have elevated into an art and focal point of their campaign and platform,” added Tamano.

The Commission on Elections (Comelec) also recognizes that detainees who are not convicted of any crime or punished by the Revised Penal Code, penal laws, or regulations are still presumed innocent of the accusations against them. Thus, they, among others, retain their right of suffrage.

The Comelec reported that at least 23,657 detainees are eligible to vote in 414 facilities of the Bureau of Jail Management and Penology. This represents 43 percent of the total 54,866-detainee population.

The NP bet said Roxas’ remarks have assaulted the inmates of Cebu Provincial Detention and Rehabilitation Center who have brought pride and distinction to the Philippines for their synchronized dancing videos on YouTube.

Choreographers of Michael Jackson even filmed the inmates’ dance interpretation of the pop icon’s music. The video clip of the inmates’ performance was included in the globally released music video.

Nonetheless, Tamano thanked Roxas for giving NP a chance to highlight one of its platforms, which is to transform the penal system from ‘retributive’ to ‘restorative.’

Villar vows to push NP’s advocacy of social justice for all Filipinos, including prioritizing the improvement of living conditions in jails, hastening resolution of pending criminal cases, providing legal representation to law offenders, and implementing rehabilitation programs for them as well.

The NP standard-bearer also echoes the church’s continuous call for people to demonstrate compassion towards marginalized groups such as prisoners. — /WAB (FREEMAN NEWS)

To Mar Roxas: No wonder your beloved wife is nababastos because ikaw ang nangunguna sa kabastusan, Wala ka ng ibang alam sabihin kundi Putang-Ina tapos nangaalipusta ka pa!

Mga AQUINO sikat sa NEW YORK TIMES dahil sa pagpatay sa mga magsasaka ng Hacienda Luisita!


ASTIG! The New York Times na!!!! Mga Aquino talaga basta sa scandals kilalang-kilala!

For Philippine Family in Politics, Land Issue Hits Home

Jes Aznar for The New York Times

Workers loaded sugar for delivery last month at Hacienda Luisita, a Philippine plantation that is owned by the family of former President Corazon C. Aquino.

By NORIMITSU ONISHI
Jes Aznar for The New York Times

A farm worker carried rice he had harvested from contested land at Hacienda Luisita, about 80 miles north of Manila.

HACIENDA LUISITA, the Philippines — Like his father before him, Buenaventura Calaquian worked the sugar cane fields at Hacienda Luisita, a plantation owned by the family of former President Corazon C. Aquino. In the long-running, sometimes bloody battle over control of the land here, Mr. Calaquian, 58, has come out better than most.

For the last few years, he has illegally occupied 3.7 acres on which he cultivates rice and vegetables. He spends most days watching his fields from a makeshift shack whose thatched roof is patched with flattened cardboard boxes. Small profits from tomato sales have allowed him to buy 50 ducks that now swim in a nearby creek.

“I never want to go back to sugar cane,” Mr. Calaquian said as his wife, Maria, 46, used a single bucket to carry water from the creek over to several uneven rows of tomato vines. “This is better.”

Despite the government’s assertion that a two-decade-old land distribution program has been a success, most farmers in the Philippines have yet to benefit significantly. The uneven ownership of land, this country’s primordial problem, continues to concentrate economic and political power in the hands of large landowning families and to fuel armed insurgencies, including Asia’s longest-running Communist rebellion.

The land problem has drawn fresh attention since Mrs. Aquino’s son, Benigno Aquino III, declared his candidacy for the May 10 presidential election, running on his mother’s legacy of “people power.” Though Mrs. Aquino made land reform a top priority, she allowed landowning families to eviscerate her distribution program. Critics say there is no greater example of the failure of land reform than her own family’s estate.

For the past five years, the family has been fighting in the Supreme Court a government directive to distribute the 10,000-acre Hacienda Luisita — the second-biggest family-owned piece of land in the Philippines, about 80 miles north of Manila — to 10,000 farmers.

In 2004, the military and the police killed seven protesters during a strike by farmers fighting for land and higher wages. Since then, the family-controlled Hacienda Luisita Inc. has managed to plant only 40 percent of the estate with sugar cane; the rest has been seized by individual farmers or remains idle.

Criticized for his family’s position, Mr. Aquino, 50, the front-runner in the presidential election, announced recently that the family would transfer the land to the farmers after ensuring that debts were paid off.

“It will be theirs clear and free,” Mr. Aquino said in an interview in Manila.

But Mr. Aquino’s cousin, Fernando Cojuangco, the chief operating officer of the holding company that owns the plantation, said that the extended Cojuangco family, owners of this plantation since 1958, had no intention of giving up the land or the sugar business.

“No, we’re not going to,” Mr. Cojuangco, 47, said in an interview here. “I think it would be irresponsible because I feel that continuing what we have here is the way to go. Sugar farming has to be; it’s the kind of business that has to be done plantation-style.”

He dismissed the widely held view that Mrs. Aquino, his aunt, had made land reform a centerpiece of her government.

“Is there a document that it was a centerpiece? I always asked that question even to her ex-cabinet members. Was there a cabinet meeting where she said this is the centerpiece?”

In 1987, when Mrs. Aquino, born a Cojuangco, began carrying out land redistribution, the government estimated that 10 percent of the population controlled 90 percent of the country’s agricultural land.

The government says that under the program it has redistributed 10 million acres of privately owned land and 7.4 million acres of public land, allowing each farming family to acquire up to 7.4 acres with government-backed loans. The government says owners who relinquish land have received compensation; for sugar estates, the payment is $2,000 per acre.

Last year, the government extended the program to redistribute 2.5 million acres of “problematic lands” that the authorities have been unable to distribute “because of the resistance of some big landowners,” said Nasser C. Pangandaman, the secretary of the Department of Agrarian Reform.

Mr. Pangandaman described the program as a success. But most farmers’ groups, scholars and businessmen question the department’s figures.

“The department has never provided us with a clear and credible inventory of the lands that have been distributed,” said Rafael V. Mariano, a congressman who is a member of Anakpawis, a union-based political party.

What is more, lawmakers, most of whom come from large landowning families, included loopholes in the program, critics say.

“Because of the loopholes, landlords have been able to find all sorts of ways and means to recover their land,” said Roland G. Simbulan, a professor of development studies and public management at the University of the Philippines.

The biggest loophole, critics say, was a stock and profit-sharing program that Mrs. Aquino agreed to under pressure from large landlords. Instead of redistributing their land, about a dozen families, including her own, were allowed to turn farmers into shareholders.

The government eventually found that the Cojuangcos had violated the agreement by failing to share profits with the farmers and ordered that the land be distributed, said Mr. Pangandaman of the agrarian reform department.

Mr. Cojuangco said the ruling was a politically motivated attack against his family. The family company treated the workers well, providing health care, homes for some, interest-free loans and a guaranteed minimum wage, he said.

The farm workers at Hacienda Luisita voted in favor of the stock and profit-sharing program in 1989. But because of the decline of the sugar industry and mechanization, the amount of available work diminished steeply so that some farmers were working only one day a week by the late 1990s, said farmers and union officials.

Since the 2004 strike, many have been unable to return to work at the hacienda even as they lacked the funds to buy the seedlings and fertilizer necessary to plant crops on land they are occupying.

In a barrio called Paunawa, Esmeraldo Alcantara, 42, was one of several frustrated jobless men collecting brush to sell for about 30 cents a bundle.

“If I had land and capital, that would be ideal,” said Mr. Alcantara, who controlled a two-acre plot that he had given up trying to plant. “But since I don’t, going back to work at the hacienda would be better. But I can’t do that, either.”

A sign at the village entrance warns motorcyclists wearing helmets or bandanas to stay out — a reminder of the tumultuous strike, when union officials, farmers and supporters were assassinated, sometimes by hit men riding motorcycles. (The Philippine military, which accuses farm leaders of being tied to the Communist rebellion, is believed to be behind these kinds of killings.)

Mr. Cojuangco said he was not afraid of venturing into the hacienda that his family has controlled for three generations.

“I can go out there to the barrios,” he said.

Lito Bais, the head of the farm workers’ union, said, “If that’s true, then why isn’t he doing that?”

“I believe that as long as the Cojuangcos are here, they’ll never give up the land,” Mr. Bais said. “And as long as we’re here, we’ll never give up the struggle for this land.”

source: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/15/world/asia/15phils.html?hp